chicken skin…

jidori chicken cassoulette – all parts were utilized but it was a the skin that everyone remembers!!!

in my short time at mark’s new american cuisine i learned a lot, but mostly i learned that chef cox strives on total utilization.  nothing goes to waste in his kitchen, i mean nothing!!!  in fact, the words “total utilization is the key to success” is something i still say in the kitchen and it has become one of my many sayings…

fot the crispy chicken skin –

  • skin of one whole chicken
  • shiro shoyu
  • sugar

mop:

  1. remove skin
  2. marinade skin in shiro shoyu and sugar for 30 min
  3. stretch skim over a baking rack and secure with twine
  4. render skin in oven until some-what crispy
  5. remove from oven dab a paper towel to remove excess fat
  6. portion
  7. place in dehydrator over night
  8. get ready to live!!!
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About greensandbeans

this blog focuses on the trials & tribulations of the culinary evolution and explorations in the kitchen. it is also an open forum to discuss food ideas, techniques & most of all to expose the "happenings" and discoveries that are occurring in our very own backyard. "feedin my dreams by eatin greens & beans"... cheers, randy rucker
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2 Responses to chicken skin…

  1. Misha says:

    One of the reasons WD-50 was such a great experience for me was because completely disparate ingredients came together to produce new textures and flavors, but also triggered a memory of something very familiar at the same time. The dish of smoked eel, blood orange “zest”, black radish and chicken skin tasted like nothing I have ever had before, but the streak of emulsified chicken skin immediately brought me back home to the essence of a perfectly roasted chicken on a Sunday night.

    I didn’t remember seeing the chicken skin in the description, so when I first tasted the dish I sat there for the longest time trying to figure out how Wiley made eel taste like comfort food. That’s good cooking, folks.

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